Newsroom

July 14, 2020 – Beaver Water District Hydration Station at Ozark Smokehouse

Northwest Arkansas Land Trust, Beaver Water District and Kessler Greenways will host a dedication ceremony to celebrate the installation of new Hydration Station at Ozark Smokehouse WASHINGTON CO., ARK – Local media are invited to join in the Hydration Station Dedication Ceremony hosted by the Northwest Arkansas Land Trust, a non-governmental, nonprofit conservation organization. The ceremony will take place Friday, July 31, 2020, on the downstairs covered porch at the Ozark Smokehouse in Fayetteville from 11:30-12:30 p.m.

Attendees will include Mayor Lioneld Jordan, Beaver Water District Environmental Quality Manager James McCarty and other water district staff, Kessler Greenways Founder Frank Sharp, Northwest Arkansas Land Trust staff and Board President Eileen Jennings.

Beaver Water District partnered with the Northwest Arkansas Land Trust and Kessler Greenways to provide the hydration station. The station was installed by Frank Sharp and Cedar Valley Plumbing. It’s located just outside the Kessler Mountain Nature Center to provide clean drinking water to students, hikers and pets who visit the Outdoor Classroom’s 0.6-mile Interpretive Loop Trail, which is open to the public from sunrise to sundown 7 days a week. The trail is accessed from the picnic area just outside the Ozark Smokehouse.

Beaver Water District supplies clean, safe drinking water, sourced from Beaver Lake, to Fayetteville, Springdale, Rogers, and Bentonville. These cities in Northwest Arkansas then pump, store, distribute and resell the water to their customers. For more information, visit www.bwdh2o.org.

Northwest Arkansas Land Trust is an accredited land trust dedicated to enhancing quality of life through the permanent protection of land. By holding and managing donated land and providing conservation easement services, the Land Trust protects water quality, local farms, wildlife habitat, and places for outdoor recreation while enhancing quality of life for today and future generations. The service area of the Land Trust includes 13 counties in Northwest Arkansas, with a core focus on Benton and Washington counties. For more information, visit the land trust’s website at www.nwalandtrust.org.

Board Meeting – July 16, 2020

Tentative Agenda

Board of Directors Beaver Water District

Beaver Water District VIA GoToMeeting Conference (To request to join the call, email kmhoon@bwdh2o.org)

July 16, 2020 12:00 Noon

  1. Meeting Call to Order
  2. Roll Call
  3. Approval of minutes of previous regular meeting
  4. Recommendation – FY 2021 Personnel Budget

Other Business

    • COVID19 Status
    • Secchi Day Citizen Scientist Sampling – Saturday, August 15, 2020
    • BWD Financial Report
    • Water Production Report

EXECUTIVE SESSION

June 18, 2020 – Beaver Water District Receives 2020 Exemplary Source Water Protection Award from American Water Works Association

Dr. James McCarty (left), Manager of Environmental Quality for Beaver Water District, and Matthew Rich, Environmental Specialist, sampling Beaver Lake.

The American Water Works Association (AWWA) has recognized Beaver Water District (BWD) with the 2020 Exemplary Source Water Protection Award in the large water system category. Award recipients demonstrate the highest level of vision, goals, action plan, innovation, implementation and evaluation in the categories of small, medium and large water system. BWD, a wholesale drinking water provider, serves a population of 358,000 in Benton and Washington counties in northwest Arkansas. The system’s sole water source is Beaver Lake, a large reservoir on the White River that is vulnerable to high turbidity events and nutrient loads.

BWD partnered with the Northwest Arkansas Council to develop a Beaver Lake Watershed Protection Strategy, which became a key element in BWD’s 2012 Source Water Protection Plan. The District regularly revises and updates the plan as new data becomes available. In 2016, BWD’s Board of Directors voted to dedicate four cents per every 1,000 gallons sold to a Source Water Protection Fund. This funding ensures ongoing implementation of source water protection activities.

Through its Environmental Quality Department, BWD implements and oversees a variety of watershed protection projects, including watershed and reservoir monitoring/modeling, stream restoration and prescribed burns, research, GIS analysis, laboratory analysis, public awareness/education, and policy/regulatory review.

Currently, BWD is the sponsoring organization for a Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP) on the West Fork of the White River, an area with critical watershed and streambank erosion issues. This program is scheduled to be completed in 2022.

“Northwest Arkansas is a fast-growing region with some major fortune 500 companies and our economic growth and vitality is directly tied to the availability of clean, safe drinking water,” said James McCarty, BWD’s Source Water Protection Manager.  “We believe that if we don’t protect Beaver Lake for future generations, no one will. We know we can’t do it alone, so we try to lead the protection effort in a collaborative way, as seen in the RCPP we are sponsoring where there are more than six participating organizations involved in an $8.6 million watershed improvement effort.”

About Beaver Water District

Beaver Water District supplies clean, safe drinking water, sourced from Beaver Lake, to Fayetteville, Springdale, Rogers, and Bentonville. These cities in Northwest Arkansas then pump, store, distribute and resell the water to their customers. For more information, visit www.bwdh2o.org.

Board Meeting – June 18, 2020

Tentative Agenda

Board of Directors Beaver Water District

Beaver Water District VIA GoToMeeting Conference (To request to join the call, email kmhoon@bwdh2o.org)

June 18, 2020 12:00 Noon

  1. Meeting Call to Order
  2. Roll Call
  3. Approval of minutes of previous regular meeting
  4. Recognition – AWWA 2020 Exemplary Source Water Protection Award
  5. Presentation — 2020 Strategic Plan Update
  6. Presentation – FY 2019 Process Improvement Plan Report

Other Business

    • COVID19 Status
    • Water Production Report

June 11, 2020 – Annual Secchi Day Science Fair Goes Virtual in 2020

To ensure everyone’s safety during the coronavirus pandemic, the “in-person” 15th Annual Secchi Day Science Fair at Prairie Creek Park on Beaver Lake in Rogers, Ark., that was scheduled for Aug. 15, is cancelled this year.  Instead, the public is invited to participate via an Online Virtual Secchi Day Science Fair 2020 with videos and photos of Environmental and Water Education activities for local citizens and friends around the world to learn from and enjoy. This is a work in progress. Please keep an eye on Beaver Water District’s website at bwdh2o.org, as well as following Beaver Water District and our partners on Social Media pages. Secchi Day sampling activities will continue this year with all the necessary precautions to ensure everyone is safe. Secchi Day is named for the Secchi Disk, a black and white device lowered into the water to measure clarity.

Enter the Water Education Contest

Beaver Water District’s Water Education Contest deadline has been extended to June 30th. So, get busy and you’ll receive a Triangle Cooling-Cloth Bandana. It’s easy. Just choose from an activity listed below, take photos, then email education@bwdh2o.org with the photos, name and mailing address. Include the number of bandanas for those who participated. Supplies are limited to one bandana per person. Some photos will be posted to @BeaverWaterDistrict on Facebook. Please also post your photos to social media with the hashtag #bwdh2o. If you have a question, email education@bwdh2o.org.

 

  • Sweep your driveway, patio, or sidewalk with a broom instead of hosing it off or using a blower. This conserves water resources, reduces noise pollution, and saves on electricity.
  • Put leaf litter and yard clippings in a compost pile or a brown paper leaf bag you deliver to or have picked up by City Compost or Mulch facilities. Resource: Compost and Composting.
  • Spread straw, wood chips, or other organic mulch in flower beds, gardens, and erosion prone areas of bare soil. Resource: Conservation Tips for Landscaping.
  • Color a page from the Water Fun Facts Coloring Book.

May 21, 2020 — Beaver Water District’s Adam Motherwell Reappointed to National Water Committee

Adam K. Motherwell, CPA, of Fayetteville, Chief Financial Officer for Beaver Water District (BWD), has been reappointed to the Audit Committee of the American Water Works Association for a new three-year term (2020-2023).

Motherwell joined BWD in 2014. A graduate of the Walton College of Business, he has 42 years of experience, including 14 years serving as Associate Dean for Finance & Administration in the Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville; corporate auditor; Arkansas Division of Legislative auditor; and University of Arkansas System Auditor. His credentials include Certified Public Accountant (CPA), past Certified Fraud Examiner (CFE), University of Arkansas Credit Union Treasurer, and Chairman of the Audit Committee for the City of Fayetteville.

BWD’s mission is to serve our customers’ needs by providing high quality drinking water that meets or exceeds all regulatory requirements and is economically priced consistent with our quality standards. BWD supplies clean, safe drinking water, sourced from Beaver Lake, to Fayetteville, Springdale, Rogers, and Bentonville. These cities in Northwest Arkansas then pump, store, distribute and resell the water to their customers — more than 350,000 people and industries in their cities and surrounding areas. For more information, contact Amy Wilson, Director of Public Affairs, at awilson@bwdh2o.org.

Board Meeting – May 21, 2020

Tentative Agenda

Board of Directors Beaver Water District

Beaver Water District VIA GoToMeeting Conference (To request to join the call, email kmhoon@bwdh2o.org)

May 21, 2020 12:00 Noon

  1. Meeting Call to Order
  2. Roll Call
  3. Approval of minutes of previous regular meeting
  4. Recommendation – Preliminary Design Agreement for Engineering Services – Olsson – Western Corridor Transmission Line
  5. Recommendation — Preliminary Design Agreement for Engineering  Services – Black & Veatch – Western Corridor Pump Station
  6. Recommendation – FY 2021 Financial Plan
  7. Recommendation – Compensation Study – Salary Structure

Other Business

    • COVID19 Status
    • Water Production Report

May 11, 2020 — Algae is the Culprit behind Drinking Water Taste and Odor Issues

Increasing amounts of algae in Beaver Lake may lead some customers to detect taste or odor in their drinking water right now. What is important to remember is that the water is safe to drink, according to officials with Beaver Water District (BWD).

“During some springs, conditions in Beaver Lake can favor the rapid growth of algae,” said Dr. James McCarty, Environmental Quality Manager for BWD. “While most algae are relatively benign, some can impact the taste and odor of the finished drinking water.”

One such algae, Uroglena volvox, is experiencing a bloom in parts of Beaver Lake right now.  Some Uroglena are known for imparting a fishy taste and smell to the water.  The last time we experienced a spring Uroglena bloom was in 2015.  While some of our customers may be sensitive to its taste and smell, the blooms are typically short-lived.  Regardless, the water is still safe to drink.

Taste and odor issues occur as a result of environmental conditions, but human actions can be a contributor, officials said, adding that they want customers to understand the cause of taste and odor and be proactive about taking care of Beaver Lake. To help keep the lake free of too many nutrients, which contribute to the growth of algae, maintain your septic systems, don’t over fertilize lawns, and contain sediment and dirt on construction sites with silt fencing or other stormwater best management practices.

During events such as these, taste and odor at the tap can be minimized in a variety of ways. For instance, chilling water and/or adding some lemon to the water will help. In addition, carbon filters – the type used in water pitchers or attached to faucets, are effective at removing taste and odor compounds in drinking water.

“These taste and odor issues are not unique to our area,” McCarty said. “It’s just a seasonal event. It may last a few weeks, but the timeframe varies. No matter how short or long the duration of the event, however, we want to assure our customers that the water is safe to drink.”

BWD’s mission is to serve our customers’ needs by providing high quality drinking water that meets or exceeds all regulatory requirements and is economically priced consistent with our quality standards. BWD supplies clean, safe drinking water, sourced from Beaver Lake, to Fayetteville, Springdale, Rogers, and Bentonville. These cities in Northwest Arkansas then pump, store, distribute and resell the water to their customers — more than 350,000 people and industries in their cities and surrounding areas. For more information, contact Amy Wilson, Director of Public Affairs, at awilson@bwdh2o.org.

Drinking Water Week is May 3-9! Enter the Water Ed Contest. Deadline is May 31

Once a year for the past several decades, Beaver Water District (BWD) has observed the first week in May as Drinking Water Week. “The ability to meet our Mission and Vision at Beaver Water District, to serve our customers’ needs by providing high quality drinking water and to meet the challenges of our community by preserving the quality of our source, Beaver Lake, is made much easier by the efforts, expertise, and commitment of our four customer cities,” said Lane Crider, CEO of BWD. “As we celebrate Drinking Water Week 2020, Beaver Water District wants to recognize the cities of Fayetteville, Springdale, Rogers and Bentonville, and thank them for doing their part in providing drinking water to all consumers of this most valuable resource here in Northwest Arkansas.” This year, BWD invites the public to “virtually” kick off the celebration, which is May 3-9, by participating in a Water Education Contest, led by the District’s education team.

“The first step in the drinking water treatment process is source water protection,” said Dot Neely, Education Coordinator for BWD. “In Northwest Arkansas, the source we want to take care of is Beaver Lake, which supplies water for one in six Arkansans. So that’s the focus for our Water Education Contest.” Participate in the Water Education Contest, which ends on May 31, and receive a water-themed bandana.

In addition to the contest, BWD is rolling out its updated “Your Water for Life” campaign with public service announcements (PSAs) that emphasize the connection between Beaver Lake source water protection and production of drinking water for Northwest Arkansas. “The PSA begins with a question to get people thinking about why they should care about water,” said Amy Wilson, BWD’s Director of Public Affairs. The message goes on to explain that many of us simply expect the water to be there when we turn on the faucet, but there’s a lot that goes into making water from Beaver Lake clean and available for customers. “Part of the PSA showcases our environmental staff at work monitoring the quality of the water in our tributaries and the lake,” she said. “It’s important to protect Beaver Lake and keep it clean. Our dedicated professionals closely monitor water quality in the lake and its tributaries. At the end of the day, it’s all about protecting our resources.” The slogan for the campaign is “It’s Your Water for Life!”